Mecklenburg Speed Detection Tactics

When considering speeding cases, the Mecklenburg court does not require any physical evidence of speed detection, any paperwork or printout to be offered as evidence by an officer. Regarding someone’s speed, the officer can offer their testimony on what type of technique they use to assess the speed. If what the officer used to detect speed was a mechanical radar or LIDAR, they would need to testify that their equipment was tested and found to be working accurately. They must also testify that they have been trained on that and that they clearly identified the person who was charged as the driver in the vehicle.

If what the officer used to detect speed was a mechanical radar or LIDAR, they would need to testify that their equipment was tested and found to be working accurately. They must also testify that they have been trained on that and that they clearly identified the person who was charged as the driver in the vehicle.

Mecklenburg speed detection tactics play a role in the way your case will be handled in court. If you are facing speeding or reckless driving charges, a distinguished speeding attorney can help you build a defense based on the facts of your case.

Pacing and Speeding Issues

Pacing is very an infrequent Mecklenburg speed detection tactic and is usually only used in cases where the person is alleged to be traveling at a speed that even an experienced person without a trained eye to speeding vehicles would be as far beyond the scope of the speed limit for where they are. The most frequent cases are either close to a 100 or over a 100 in zones where the state limit is at that. Pacing is admissible evidence in speeding cases.

The main issue is going to rest on how fast the person is alleged to have been going in comparison to the regular flow of the speed limit in the area. It is hard to look at a vehicle in a 55 zone and say they were going 70 because with the appropriate equipment that can be gauged accurately.

However, an officer with a certain number of years and experience, and comfortably testify the gauge of the vehicle if a person is going double the speed limit; hypothetically, 90 on a 45 and that can be seen with a naked eyes and is based on  a police officer’s many years of experience and numerous traffic stops.

Pacing and Speeding Defenses

The defense can try undermining the accuracy of radar or LIDAR equipment, by saying they cannot determine how fast the vehicle is going. If another factor has to be taken into consideration, it is how long the law enforcement personnel had to observe the vehicle at the speed that they are alleging with law enforcement in the vehicle that was also moving at the same time. Were they going in different directions? A variety of things are going to be factors of detection.

Law Enforcement Tools and Tactics

Mecklenburg speed detection tactics for law enforcement include radar, LIDAR, and pacing, which is rarely used.Traffic radar instruments used in Mecklenburg are very accurate. One issue with traffic radar instruments is that they could potentially get the speed of a different vehicle and call over the wrong one. If the office testifies that they have been trained on the use of the radar and that the radar was tested before and after a shift and found to be working accurately, it’ is given a tremendous amount of weight.

Contesting an Officer’s Claim

A potential defense for Mecklenburg speed detection tactics include saying that the officer was not properly trained or experienced, they did not calibrate or test their equipment malfunction, or there has been a recall of certain types of equipment. There is almost never an operator error in the use of radar offense.

The driver can offer their own version of events however that is a challenging defense because the officer is generally more familiar with the area where the tickets are issued in Mecklenburg County than a lot of people that are passing through. They can say that they were not going that fast and that maybe that person got a different vehicle in their beam, or maybe the weather was affecting their equipment, et cetera.

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